This Thanksgiving, Add a Simple, Kid-Friendly Dish to Your Table

sweet-potato-recipe

One of my favorite aspects about the holidays is re-creating traditions for our family that I hope our children will come to treasure for years to come. This includes re-making many of the dishes we grew up eating around the holidays and adding new spins to the traditional classics.  

Enter the Sweet Potato. This humble starchy vegetable often gets a bad rap or is typically an afterthought addition to the Thanksgiving table. We were accustomed to having sweet potatoes loaded with the customary marshmallow topping. However, once our family began hosting Thanksgiving, I knew I wanted to recreate this dish for the entire family to enjoy.  

So if you’re looking for a Thanksgiving recipe that is guaranteed to be a crowd pleaser (kids, too!) or if you want to give an old classic a makeover, look no further - this dish will have you covered! This sweet potato casserole is now my go-to recipe each year, and my entire family looks forward to it. While we are big fans of Thanksgiving leftovers, there isn’t usually much left of this dish at the end of the meal, and my kids usually go back for more.  

Try this easy, kid-friend Thanksgiving side-dish for your holiday meal or for any weeknight dinner! Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A, dietary fiber, B-vitamins, and minerals and will compliment many main courses for your family meal. My personal favorite part of this recipe is how easy it is to put together. This can be prepared a day ahead, stored in the fridge and then baked just prior to serving.

Have your kids join you in the kitchen by helping with some of these simple steps, like mashing the sweet potatoes or stirring ingredients together.

Sweet Potato Casserole (Serves About 8)

(To make this dish, you will need about 5 large sweet potatoes, cooked. Bake your sweet potatoes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit until soft and peel in advance to have ready for assembly).

Ingredients

Sweet Potato Filling:

  • About 3 cups cooked sweet potato (from approximately 5 large sweet potatoes)

  • 2 large eggs, beaten

  • ½ cup heavy cream (can substitute with unsweetened coconut/almond milk)

  • ½ cup unsalted butter, melted

  • ¼ cup honey (add more or less depending on how sweet you like your dish)

  • 1.5 teaspoons vanilla extract

  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt

Topping:

  • 1 cup almond flour (can substitute with coconut or whole wheat flour)

  • 2 tablespoons whole, rolled oats

  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted

  • 1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

  • 2 tablespoons honey

  • ⅛ teaspoon sea salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F

  2. In a mixing bowl, add all ingredients for the sweet potato filling.  Mix thoroughly, being sure to mash sweet potatoes and stir all ingredients until well combined. Layer in an 11 x 7in baking dish.

  3. To make the topping for the sweet potato casserole, add the almond flour, oats, butter, honey and sea salt to a bowl and mix to combine. Stir in chopped nuts. Sprinkle the topping mixture evenly over the sweet potato layer in the baking dish. Bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until topping is golden brown.

That’s all there is to this! Most importantly, whatever dishes are part of your Thanksgiving meal, may you enjoy the fellowship and memories that come with bringing loved ones together. Enjoy!

What is your favorite Thanksgiving dish?

If the thought of food around the holidays brings you stress, anxiety or causes you to feel overwhelmed, know that you are not alone. Reach out for help and support during this time to find peace with food during the holidays and for years to come.

Connect with me today to begin your journey toward a more peaceful relationship with food and your body!

Crystal Karges, MS, RDN, IBCLC

Crystal Karges Nutrition

Crystal Karges, MS, RDN, IBCLC is a San Diego-based private practice dietitian helping others embrace their health for themselves and their loved ones.  Focusing on maternal/child health and eating disorders, Crystal creates the nurturing, safe environment that is needed to help guide individuals towards a peaceful relationship with food and their bodies.